[Guest post] Crown Mountain – the taste of conquering a crown

Gostaria de ler esse post em Português? Clique aqui.

Since I’ve arrived in Vancouver, I’ve been hiking a couple of mountains, lakes and parks. What started as a touristy activity, fortunately became part of my new life-style, a real passion. I’ve found in nature the peace I had been looking for and in addition, the certainty that I’m always going to live a unique adventure as the challenges are always going to appear in different ways on the trails. Therefore, I’ve started searching for more challenging trails, instead of easy and mainstream ones. That’s when I discovered Crown Mountain, the hardest challenge for me so far.

What makes this trail so difficult is you have to hike down a very steep trail into Crown Pass before hiking up the steep side of Crown Mountain, then return the same route. The elevation change is therefore misleading compared to other hikes as you have to essentially hike the elevation change twice. (Vancouver Trails)

After two unsuccessfully attempts to reach the top of Crown Mountain, a friend and I decided we should try it once again. In both, we’ve supposed to be stronger than the nature trying to face a bad weather condition. But our third attempt should be a success, thus we thought about our mistakes in order to prepare ourselves better and waited for the day with the best weather conditions. There wouldn’t be anything able to discourage us to reach the Crown’s top. We had made up our minds and were focused on reaching that.

Cloudy and rainy weather have pushed us off the mountain in our very first attempt.

In order to save energy for the Crown trail, we ascended the Grouse Grind in 1h27m. An average of 20 minutes above the time we had done the last times. Then we stopped at the Grouse restaurant for a quick coffee and later on headed to the Crown trail. At the Grouse top, the staff were already making arrangements for the ski season, throwing snow with some machines and covering all the ground. The landscape and the environment were completely different from some weeks ago.

lake-crown-before-later-copyright

Two photos at the same place in a four-week span.

The trail was also looking quite different from our last attempts. There were ice and snow on some places, which turned the path slippery and a little bit dangerous. Some parts of the trail looked like an ice skating rink, we didn’t have another choice but slide over the ice from one point to the other. And when we were neither sliding nor walking, we had to climb. We often stopped for a couple of minutes staring at the frozen rocks and the water draining beneath the ice, trying to figure out a way to go forward on the blocked path on the trail. The risk of falling and rolling down the slope was imminent. The adrenaline is always inherent in the mountain.

IMG_3371-copyright

Ice skating was sometimes the only option to go forward on the trail.

Despite all the obstacles and risks presented on our way, we headed up on a good pace. That was when we got at the point we had stopped in our very first hike. From there on, everything would be new. We double-checked our map and saw that we were close to the summit. The anxiety increased after each footstep. The feeling of being so close of a tough conquer was relieving.

ice-rotated

Stalactites that looked like ice spears.

The last footsteps till the summit seemed the longest. The mountain somehow seemed to push me up, giving me strength when I had none left. And the summit’s sight preview was stunning. Every breath filled up my lungs with a cold and light air. The feeling of happiness was unique, generated by an incredible sight of the snowy mountain-tops and endless valleys full of trees.

Shortly afterwards, we spotted a crow on the summit. Our goal was to get to the spot where it was sitting, but it seemed to reign there, showing to be the mountain’s owner when it looked at us. As if it was saying to us that it gets there way faster and with a lot less effort than us, whenever it wanted. However, the king of the mountain was generous and flew subtly over a stone beside and conceived us some room, so we could feel like kings for a while as well.

IMG_3406-edited-copyright

The last footsteps till the summit. The king was already there.

Sitting on a stone at 1,504 meters high left me speechless. Any neglect or loss of balance could cost my life. There wasn’t anything below to hold me if I slipped down. A 360-degree spin gave me a real notion of how high we were. It was possible to see Squamish and Whistler mountain ranges northwards, the Coquitlam region mountain range and Chilliwack eastwards, the Vancouver Island westwards and even a couple of mountains from the USA border southwards. I didn’t know where to look at. At this point it became clear to me why the crow felt like the king sitting on that stone, privileged to be able to have that sight whenever it wanted.

crown2-copyright

The numerous valleys and the snowy mountains from the Squamish and Whistler area.

I started counting with my friend the quantity of valleys that we could see eastwards and we count 8. Between one valley and another, there were mountains full of pine trees still green and some of them even with snow at the top. That sequence, whimsically sculpted by the nature, gave me the impression that the mountains were like the waves of the sea and were in constant movement taking us far away. However the most impressive was in fact the uninterrupted silence, that gave me a felling of being in another dimension. The silence would only be broken every now and then by the cry of a crow or the wind bypassing the mountain. It was a mysterious silence, that didn’t bother us at all. It seemed to have so much going on down there in the forest, but at the same time we seemed to be far from any living being. A rare silence full of peace, impossible to be felt in the city.

IMG_3412 - Goat Mountain and Mount Baker-edited-copyright

The Goat Mountain featured and all the grandeur of Mount Baker in the background, with its 3,286 m altitude and the 116km away in a straight line, already in American territory.

The English Bay ships looked like toys, as if somebody had put them with the fingers and left them there stopped for hours. The city buildings, trees and parks seemed a scene of the game The Sims, and for sure, as if I was there playing it. I saw the city but the city didn’t see me. I didn’t hear the city and nobody heard me as well. I was close to everything and far away at the same time. I was on the mountain, but the world continued to happen.

IMG_3413-edited-copyright

The mirror, the model and the ship toys.

At a mountain-top, the sun is the only thing that makes us realize that time hasn’t stopped. And the autumn Sun always far on the horizon illuminated English Bay and the sea, reflecting the sun’s light like a mirror. The valleys located behind the high mountains shouldn’t had received a single sun light for days, and sure enough, will stay like this for the next few months. Its warmth, which almost didn’t reach us, wasn’t enough to keep us warm. Luckily there was no wind and we were well bundled up this time. Moreover, the temperature at the top of the Crown should be nearing 0° C. As the sun was going down, we remembered then that it was time to go, after all it was an autumn day and there was just over 8 hours of daylight. We couldn’t ignore the time, otherwise the descent in the dark could be even harder.

The way back wasn’t worse because we rested and relaxed our legs at the top of the mountain. We came back slowly, but in a constant pace, with that wonderful sensation of a conquered goal. Even though, between one climb and another on the trail, I would feel the thigh muscle pulling off and begging to me to stop. Of course that I would ignore it and kept on walking. However, some stops were inevitable so we could appreciate the beauty of the sunset, shyly shinning between the pines, with the city lighting up and preparing itself for the night. And before returning to the city, we still stopped for a while at the beginning of the trail to appreciate the last rays of sun on the horizon and the uncountable stars starting to show up in the clear sky.

IMG_3500-edited-copyright

The city lighting up with the arrival of dusk.

The bigger the challenge, the bigger the will to conquer it. It might be a mountain-top or all the challenges that show up in life, we should never give up our dreams and goals, it doesn’t matter how many times we’ll have to attempt or how hard they’ll be, if we believe we can do it, so we really can. The Crown Mountain was one of the biggest psychological tests I’ve ever had in my life. However, it made me discover that I’m stronger that I thought I was. And such as in life, the mountain had set up rules and had determined tough obstacles to reach it. As if it was a queen and had given us a message: “I’ll make you think about quitting from start to finish, but if you persist you won’t regret conquering my crown.”. Do I still need to say whether it was worth it or not?

dusk-copyright

All the time the Sun is always down for some and rising for others. Challenges that come to an end, new challenges that arise.

Advertisements

[Post convidado] Crown Mountain – O sabor da conquista de uma coroa

Do you wanna read it in English? Click here.

Desde quando cheguei em Vancouver tenho feito algumas trilhas. Entre montanhas, lagos e parques, o que começou como uma atividade turística acabou se tornando parte do meu novo estilo de vida, uma verdadeira paixão. Encontrei na natureza a paz que eu tanto procurava e além disso, a certeza de que sempre irei viver uma aventura única já que os desafios sempre irão surgir nas trilhas em diversas maneiras. Comecei então a procurar por trilhas mais desafiadoras, ao invés das mais fáceis e populares. Foi quando descobri a Crown Mountain, meu maior desafio até o momento.

O que faz essa trilha ser tão difícil é que você tem que descer uma trilha muito íngreme até a passagem da Crown antes de subir o lado íngreme da Crown Mountain, e então retornar pelo mesmo trajeto. A mudança de elevação engana se comparada com outras trilhas, pois você tem que essencialmente caminhar pela mudança de elevação duas vezes. (Vancouver Trails)

Depois de duas tentativas mal-sucedidas de chegar ao topo da Crown Mountain, um amigo e eu decidimos que deveríamos tentar novamente. Em ambas, achamos que poderíamos ser mais fortes que a natureza tentando encarar as péssimas condições do tempo. Mas nossa terceira tentativa deveria ser bem-sucedida, assim refletimos sobre nossos erros pra nos prepararmos melhor e esperamos pelo dia com as melhores condições climáticas. Não haveria algo que pudesse nos desencorajar a chegar ao topo da Crown. Nós estavámos convencidos e focados em chegar lá.

Fomos expulsos da montanha devido ao tempo nublado e chuvoso na nossa primeira tentativa.

Com o intuito de guardar energia para a Crown, subimos a Grouse Grind em 1h27m. Uns 20 minutos acima do tempo que tinhamos feito das últimas vezes. Paramos então no restaurante da Grouse para um café rápido e seguimos para a trilha da Crown. No topo da Grouse, os funcionários já estavam preparando a pista de esqui para a temporada, jogando gelo com as máquinas e cobrindo todo o chão. A paisagem e o ambiente eram completamente diferentes de algumas semanas anteriores.

lake-crown-before-later-copyright

Duas fotos do mesmo lugar com 4 semanas de diferença.

A trilha também estava bem diferente das últimas vezes. Havia gelo e neve em alguns trechos, o que deixava o caminho escorregadio e um pouco perigoso. Algumas partes da trilha pareciam uma pista de patinação no gelo, não tinhamos então outra opção a não ser deslizar sobre o gelo de um ponto ao outro. E quando não estávamos deslizando ou caminhando, tinhamos que escalar. Diversas vezes ficávamos parados por minutos observando as pedras congeladas e a água escorrendo por baixo do gelo, tentando descobrir uma forma de avançar o caminho obstruído na trilha. O risco de cair e rolar ribanceira abaixo era iminente. Segurança era algo inexistente. A adrenalina é inerente na montanha.

IMG_3371-copyright

Patinar no gelo às vezes era a única opção para avançar na trilha.

Apesar de todos os obstáculos e riscos presentes no caminho, seguimos numa velocidade boa. Foi quando chegamos ao ponto que tinhamos parado da primeira vez. A partir dali, tudo seria novidade. Confirmamos no mapa e vimos que faltava pouco para alcançarmos o topo. A ansiedade aumentava a cada passo. A sensação de estar tão perto de uma dura conquista era aliviadora.

ice-rotated

Stalactites que mais pareciam lanças de gelo.

Os últimos passos até o topo da montanha parecem ser os mais longos. Mas a montanha parece de alguma forma me empurrar para cima e colocar as forças que já faltavam nas minhas pernas. E a prévia da vista do topo é estonteante. Cada respirada enchia meus pulmões com um ar frio e leve. O sentimento de felicidade era único, pois era gerado por uma vista incrível das montanhas com neve no topo e vales intermináveis repletos de árvores.

Logo avistamos um corvo no cume. Nosso objetivo era chegar onde ele estava, mas ele parecia reinar e demonstrava ser o dono da montanha quando olhava pra nós. Como se estivesse nos dizendo que ele chega ali muito mais rápido que nós e com muito menos esforço que nós, na hora que ele quiser. Mas o rei da montanha foi generoso, voou sutilmente para uma pedra ao lado e nos deu espaço para nos sentirmos reis também por alguns instantes.

IMG_3406-edited-copyright

Os últimos passos até o topo. O rei já estava lá.

Estar sentado em uma pedra a 1.504 metros de altitude me deixou sem palavras. Qualquer descuido ou perda de equilibrio poderia custar minha vida. Não havia nada abaixo de mim para me segurar caso eu escorregasse. Um giro de 360º com a cabeça me dava a real noção de quão alto estavámos. Era possível ver a cadeia de montanhas de Squamish e Whistler ao norte, a cadeia de montanhas da região de Coquitlam e Chilliwack ao leste, a Vancouver Island ao oeste e até algumas montanhas da fronteira com os EUA ao sul. Eu não sabia pra onde olhar. Neste momento ficou claro pra mim porque o corvo se sentia o rei sentado naquela pedra, privilegiado ele por poder ter essa vista quando quiser.

crown2-copyright

Os inúmeros vales e as montanhas nevadas da região de Squamish e Whistler ao fundo.

Comecei a contar com meu amigo a quantidade de vales que conseguíamos ver em direção ao leste, conseguimos contar 8. E entre um vale e outro, haviam as montanhas repletas de pinheiros ainda verdes e algumas com neve no topo. Essa sequência, caprichosamente esculpida pela natureza, me dava a impressão de que as montanhas eram como as ondas do mar e estavam em pleno movimento nos levando pra longe. Mas o mais impressionante mesmo era o silêncio, tão constante que me dava a impressão de estar em outra dimensão. Poucas vezes interrompido pelo grito de um corvo ou do vento contornando a montanha. Era um silêncio misterioso, um silêncio que não incomodava. Parecia ter tanta coisa acontecendo lá embaixo dentro da floresta, mas ao mesmo tempo parecíamos estar distantes de qualquer ser vivo. Um silêncio raro cheio de paz, impossível de ser sentido na cidade.

IMG_3412 - Goat Mountain and Mount Baker-edited-copyright

A Goat Mountain em destaque e toda a imponência do Mount Baker ao fundo, com seus 3.286m de altitude e a 116km de distância em linha reta, já em território americano.

Cidade que de lá de cima parecia ser uma maquete. Os navios na English Bay pareciam de brinquedo, como se alguém tivesse colocado eles com o dedo e deixado lá por horas parados. Os prédios, árvores e parques da cidade pareciam uma cena do jogo The Sims, e claro, como se eu estivesse ali jogando. Eu via a cidade mas ela não me via. Eu não ouvia a cidade e ninguém também me ouvia. Eu estava perto de tudo e longe ao mesmo tempo. Eu estava na montanha, mas o mundo continuou acontecendo.

IMG_3413-edited-copyright

O espelho, a maquete e os navios de brinquedo.

No topo de uma montanha, a única certeza que temos de que o tempo não parou é o sol. E o sol de outono sempre longe no horizonte iluminava a English Bay e o mar que refletiam sua luz como um espelho. Os vales localizados atrás das altas montanhas já deviam estar há dias sem receber uma luz sequer do sol, e com certeza, passarão os próximos meses assim. Seu calor, que quase não chegava em nós, era insuficiente para nos aquecer.  Por sorte não ventava forte e estávamos (dessa vez) bem agasalhados. Aliás, a temperatura no topo da Crown devia estar beirando os 0ºC. Conforme o sol foi baixando, lembramos então que era hora de partir, afinal era um dia de outono, tinhamos pouco mais de 8 horas de luz natural, não podiamos esquecer do tempo, senão a descida no escuro poderia ficar mais difícil ainda.

O caminho de volta só não foi pior por causa do descanso e da relaxada nas pernas que tivemos no topo. Voltamos devagar, mas numa velocidade constante, com aquela sensação maravilhosa de objetivo conquistado. Ainda assim, entre uma escalada e outra da trilha, eu sentia o músculo da coxa puxando e implorando para eu parar. Claro que eu o ignorava e continuava andando. Contudo, algumas paradas foram inevitáveis pra apreciarmos a beleza do pôr-do-sol que timidamente brilhava entre os pinheiros, e a cidade se iluminando preparando-se para a noite. E antes de retornar à cidade, ainda paramos por um tempo no início da trilha pra apreciarmos os últimos raios de sol no horizonte e as incontáveis estrelas começando a aparecerem no céu limpo.

IMG_3500-edited-copyright

A cidade se iluminando com a chegada do anoitecer.

Quanto maior o desafio, aior a vontade de conquistá-lo. Pode ser o topo de uma montanha ou todos os desafios que aparecem na via, nós não devemos nunca desistir dos nossos sonhos e objetivos, nao importa quantas vezes nos teremos que tentar ou quao dificil eles serão, se acreditamos que podemos fazer, entao realmente podemos. A Crown Mountain foi um dos maiores testes psicológicos que já tive na minha vida. Porem, me fez descobrir que sou mais forte do que pensava ser. E assim como na vida, a montanha definiu suas regras e determinou duros obstaculos para chegar la. Como se ela fosse uma rainha e tivesse dado o recado: “vou fazer você pensar em desistir do início ao fim, mas se você persistir não se arrependerá de conquistar a minha coroa”. Preciso dizer se valeu a pena?

dusk-copyright

A todo momento o sol está sempre se pondo para alguns e nascendo para outros. Desafios que chegam ao fim, novos desafios que vem a surgir.

[Guest post] The day I was close to the sky twice

Gostaria de ler esse post em Português? Clique aqui.

In my last post I wrote (and showed) a little bit about Vancouver city, its surroundings, its gorgeous nature and some amazing trails around here. Today I’m going to tell you guys about the trail that has marked my life and made me definitely feel that I’m in Canada.

It was a sunny summer Sunday and I had scheduled with my friend to get on the very first bus of the line 160 right after 9am. We wanted to arrive early in Buntzen Lake Park to hike and enjoy the day. We got off in Port Moody to take another bus (C26) and some minutes later we arrived in the park. At 10:30am we were ready to start the trail.

bear3

Warnings before the start of the trail let people aware of the existence of bears in the area and also warn people to be careful.

The beginning of the trail is really easy and well signalized, but soon the one-thousand meters climbing starts and my sedentary legs began to hurt. It’s a peaceful trail, we met only a couple of few people on our way, perhaps because there’s not much information about it on Internet, which gave us a even higher sensation of freedom, because when we were not talking it was possible to hear the sound of the birds and squirrels running through the bushes. Every person who likes nature, would appreciate this moment.

tree-name

Twin trees grew over the rocks and built a cave.

After some hours going up we had already a preview of the sight from the mountain. We had stopped for a while and kept hiking. The heat and the sweat were increasing and our bottles of water getting empty. We were hoping to fill our bottles with water from some river during the trail, but almost all of them were dry or with no apparent drinkable conditions. The first challenge had been set for us. Even though, the trail and the park in general have a different energy, many mushrooms and blueberries everywhere made the trail become lively. All types and sizes of pines made us stop often to take some pictures and appreciate them.

mushrooms-name

I was willing to eating those huge mushrooms on the trail. (Maybe hallucinogens?)

It was about 1:30pm and we had already been hiking for a long time neither meeting nor hearing anybody. The silence was almost absolute. The sensation that we were far away from everything, from everybody and nobody knew where we were, it was like an immersion in the middle of nowhere. But all of a sudden the silence was broken. We heard a strong noise coming from somewhere in the middle of the bushes. At that time we stopped hiking and were speechless, we knew that the strong noise wasn’t being made neither by a squirrel nor by a bird. My heart started pulsing strong. In a fraction of a second I thought about getting my camera off my backpack and start recording, but not all the moments in life wait to be recorded. After some seconds there he was: a huge black bear some 10 meters ahead of us. My friend who was in front of me just opened his arms. I was in doubt between screaming, speak something or simply wait for my death. The bear starred at us and went back to the bushes. As if we had disturbed him coming up on his way. We got close to the sky, but it wasn’t our turn to get there yet.

trilha-bw-blur-name

Just around 10 meters in front of us there was the bear. It was like to have lived a dream.

According to the story, the meeting with the bear seems to have lasted long, but actually it was just a few seconds that seemed to be forever. I felt a threat completely different of everything I’ve ever felt before, different from a robbery, or the adrenaline of skydiving, or being over 160 km/h in a highway, etc. It was like it activated on me a primitive natural instinct, as if I had come back to become part of the nature, such as the primates who lived over 200,000 years ago. My legs were shaking non stop. After that, we would stop to pay attention at any noise we heard throughout the trail, despite knowing that the probability of meeting another bear (or even the same) was very low, after all, bears don’t use to live in groups, they are roomy and live in a many-kilometer range between each other.

red-lake-name

One of the reddish lakes we found on the top of Eagle Mountain. Their colours are impressive, but all of them were lifeless.

With our legs still trembling for a long time, we followed our way. We saw some blurred-water lakes with no life on the top of the mountain and finally arrived on the top of some rocks, a little over 1,000 meter high, where I could have one of the most beautiful sights I’ve ever seen. It was possible to see from there the Buntzen Lake, Diez Vistas, North Vancouver, city of Vancouver and surroundings. The name of the mountain suddenly made sense by itself when we saw some eagles flying over our heads. After a while, some clouds showed up and started drizzling, but I knew that drizzle was falling just over us and wasn’t strong enough to reach the ground, as if it were some signal from the sky or some message for us. I felt from those rocks a closeness from the sky and a very good energy.

top mountain-name

Our sight from the top of the Eagle Mountain.

We were willing to spend the rest of the day and camp overnight there, but we weren’t ready for that. So, I hiked my way back with some certainties in my head. To come back to that place better prepared in all meanings, but also sure that after that I knew Canada indeed and had lived a unique experience. If each trail has been a different adventure and in this one I felt so close to the sky twice, what can I wait for the next ones? Actually, I’d rather not have expectations, nature always take care of us and surprises us. It is perfect.

sky-bw-name

A message from the sky: live longer, it isn’t your turn.

SOCIAL MEDIA

fb-icon twitter-icon instagram-icon pinterest-icon google-plus-icon

[Post convidado] O dia que cheguei perto do céu 2 vezes

Do you wanna read it in English? Click here.

No meu post anterior eu falei (e mostrei) um pouco sobre a cidade de Vancouver, seus arredores, sua natureza deslumbrante e algumas trilhas incríveis que existem aqui pela região. Hoje vou contar como foi a trilha que marcou a minha vida e me fez definitivamente sentir que estou no Canadá.

Era um domingo de verão ensolarado, tinha combinado com meu amigo de pegarmos o primeiro ônibus da linha 160 depois das 9h da manhã. Queríamos chegar cedo no Buntzen Lake Park pra fazermos a trilha e aproveitarmos bem o dia. Descemos em Port Moody para pegarmos o ônibus C26, alguns minutos depois chegamos no parque e às 10h30 já estávamos começando a trilha.

bear3

Avisos antes do início da trilha deixam claro sobre a existência de ursos na região e alertam para as pessoas tomarem os devidos cuidados.

No começo tudo é muito fácil e bem sinalizado, mas logo a subida de mais de 1000 metros começa e as pernas sedentárias começam a doer. A trilha não é muito movimentada, encontramos poucas pessoas no caminho, talvez por não ter tanta informação sobre ela na Internet, o que nos dá uma sensação de liberdade maior ainda, pois quando não estamos conversando é possível ouvir o barulho dos pássaros e esquilos correndo pelo mato. Tudo que uma pessoa apaixonada pela natureza gosta.

tree-name

Árvores gêmeas cresceram sobre as pedras e formaram uma caverna.

Depois de algumas horas de subida já temos uma prévia da vista da montanha. Paramos por pouco tempo e continuamos. O calor e suor foram aumentando e nossa água acabando. Tínhamos a esperança de encher nossas garrafas em algum rio na trilha, mas a maioria estava seca ou sem condições aparente de se beber. O primeiro desafio havia sido colocado pra nós. Mesmo assim, a trilha e o parque de uma forma geral possuem uma energia diferente, muitos cogumelos e blueberries por todo o lado davam vida à trilha. Pinheiros de todos os tipos e tamanhos nos faziam parar algumas vezes para tirar fotos e apreciá-los.

mushrooms-name

Vontade de comer os cogumelos gigantes da trilha.

Era por volta de 13h30 e já haviamos caminhado por um tempo sem ver nem ouvir ninguém. O silêncio era quase que absoluto. A sensação de estarmos longe de tudo, de todos e sem ninguém saber onde estávamos era como uma imersão na natureza no meio do nada. Mas de repente o silêncio foi quebrado. Ouvimos um barulho forte vindo de algum lugar do meio do mato. Na hora paramos de andar e sem precisar falar nada um pro outro sabíamos que aquele barulho não era de esquilo nem de pássaro. O coração começou a disparar. Por uma fração de segundo passou pela minha cabeça pegar a câmera na mochila e filmar, mas nem todos momentos da vida esperam pra serem registrados. Em segundos lá estava ele: um enorme urso preto a uns 10 metros na nossa frente. Meu amigo que estava na minha frente abriu os braços. Fiquei na dúvida entre gritar, falar algo ou simplesmente esperar pela morte. O urso olhou diretamente para nós e voltou para o meio do mato. Como se tivessemos atrapalhado ele entrando em seu caminho. Chegamos perto do céu, mas ainda não era nossa vez de ficar por lá.

trilha-bw-blur-name

Logo ali a 10 metros na nossa frente estava o urso. Foi como ter vivido um sonho.

Pela descrição da história, o encontro com o urso parece ter durado muito tempo, mas na verdade foram poucos segundos que pareciam que não iriam acabar mais. Senti um risco de morte completamente diferente de tudo que já havia sentido antes, diferente de um assalto, da adrenalina de um salto de para-quedas, de estar a mais de 160 km/h numa rodovia, etc. Era como se tivesse ativado em mim um instinto primitivo natural, como se eu tivesse voltado a fazer parte da natureza, assim como eram os primatas há mais de 200 mil anos. Minhas pernas tremiam sem parar. Depois disso, qualquer barulho que ouvíamos durante a trilha parávamos para prestar atenção, apesar de sabermos que a probabilidade de encontrarmos um outro (ou o mesmo) urso no parque ser mínima, afinal ursos não costumam viver em grupos, são espaçosos e vivem num raio de muitos quilômetros de distância entre um e outro.

red-lake-name

Um dos lagos avermelhados encontrados no topo da Eagle Mountain. A cor impressiona, mas todos estavam sem vida.

Com as pernas tremulas por um bom tempo, seguimos nosso caminho. Vimos alguns lagos de água turva e sem muita vida no topo da montanha e finalmente chegamos no topo de algumas pedras, a pouco mais de 1000 metros de altitude, com uma das vistas mais lindas que já vi. Era possível ver de lá de cima o Buntzen Lake, a Diez Vistas, North Vancouver, Vancouver e arredores. O nome da montanha logo fez sentido quando avistamos algumas águias sobrevoando nossas cabeças. Depois de algum tempo, algumas nuvens apareceram e começou a garoar, mas sabia que aquela garoa estava caindo somente sobre nós e não teria força para chegar lá embaixo, como se fosse algum sinal do céu ou alguma mensagem para nós. Senti dali daquelas pedras uma proximidade do céu e uma energia muito boa.

top mountain-name

Nossa vista do topo da Eagle Mountain.

A vontade era de passar o resto do dia e acampar a noite ali, mas não estavámos preparados pra isso. Fiz então o caminho de volta com algumas certezas. A de voltar pra aquele lugar melhor preparado em todos os sentidos, mas também com a certeza de ter agora de fato conhecido o Canadá e vivido uma experiência única. Se cada trilha tem sido uma aventura diferente e nessa me senti tao próximo do céu por 2 vezes, o que esperar das próximas? Na verdade, prefiro não criar expectativas, a natureza sempre cuida de nós e trata de nos surpreender. Ela é perfeita.

sky-bw-name

Uma mensagem do céu: viva mais, sua hora não é agora.

REDES SOCIAIS

fb-icon twitter-icon instagram-icon pinterest-icon google-plus-icon

[Guest post] Vancouver: where the nature gives its special touch

Gostaria de ler esse post em Português? Clique aqui.

Many people say that Vancouver is the city which least looks like a Canadian city, however they are the same people who say that Vancouver is the most beautiful city in the country. It is the least Canadian city perhaps due to the large quantity of immigrants who have been living here, especially Asians. Most beautiful probably because its surrounding mountains, parks, beaches, wooded and cleaned streets.

So that in 2011, over 8 million tourists visited Metro Vancouver, and over half of the tourists were Canadians. Over one-third of the travellers have come to Vancouver and its national and provincial parks to practise outdoors activities, such as camping, fishery, kayak, etc.

Most of the tourists have come to Vancouver during Summer and it makes sense, the city is really beautiful in summertime. Days last longer with the sun setting over 9pm. Flowers decorate streets. Music festivals have happened weekly. Many free attractions. Many people occupying parks and beaches. Vancouver is a city where the diversity is common and everybody may express themselves whatever they want, everybody here is welcome.

Vista do centro da cidade a partir do Waterfront Park em North Vancouver.

Downtown seen from Waterfront Park in North Vancouver.

But what most delighted me until now was indeed the nature. Many parks and trails are accessible by Public Transportation from Down-town and most of them are free entrance, which makes sunny weekends much cheaper to enjoy.

Man fishing in a clear river in Capilano River State Park. Accessible by bus from Downtown.

Man fishing in a clear river in Capilano River State Park. Accessible by bus from Downtown.

In the trails we can often meet whole families (including pets) hiking or camping. And even when they meet unknown people while hiking, Canadians are used to greeting whoever comes their way, therefore don’t be scared if you listen to “Hello, how are you doing?” or a simple “Hi!” with a smile from an unknown person. This is the polite Canadian way to be and live.

Upper Joffre Lake, o maior e mais bonito dos lagos em Joffre Lakes Provincial Park, um parque próximo de Pemberton, a pouco mais de 2 horas de carro de Vancouver.

Upper Joffre Lake, the largest and most beautiful lake in Joffre Lakes Provincial Park, a park near Pemberton, about 2 hours by car from Vancouver.

Spending hours hiking a trail is much more than a basic hobby to me, there’s always a new challenge. It’s about testing the body and mind limits. From the body, when the legs can’t stand it anymore. When the blisters on the foot beg you to stop. When the mouth dries and the bottle of water is over. From the mind, to control all the difficulties struggled and body limitations.

Depois de mais de uma hora subindo 1000 metros, a vista é recompensadora no Garibaldi Provincial Park.

After over one hour hiking up 1000 meters, the sight is rewarding at Garibaldi Provincial Park.

According to the legend there’s always a pot of gold in the end of the rainbow. Here in Vancouver in the end of a trail there’s always a beautiful lake with hundreds shapes of green and blue or a stunning sight of a valley, a city, of the mountains. And in the end, all the pains is forgotten and all the effort is rewarded.

Garibaldi Lake e suas dezenas de tons de verde e azul.

Garibaldi Lake and its dozens shapes of green and blue.

SOCIAL MEDIA

fb-icon twitter-icon instagram-icon pinterest-icon google-plus-icon

[Post convidado] Vancouver: onde a natureza dá seu toque especial

Do you wanna read it in English? Click here.

Muitas pessoas dizem que Vancouver é a cidade menos canadense, porém a mais bonita do país. Menos canadense talvez devido a grande quantidade de imigrantes que vivem aqui, especialmente asiáticos. Mais bonita provavelmente por causa de suas montanhas ao redor, parques, praias, ruas arborizadas e limpas.

Tanto que em 2011, mais de 8 milhões de turistas visitaram a região de Vancouver, sendo que mais da metade foram canadenses. Mais de um terço dos viajantes vieram para Vancouver e seus parques nacionais e estaduais para fazer atividades ao ar livre, como: camping, pesca, kayak, etc.

A maior parte dos turistas vem para Vancouver no verão e não é à toa, a cidade realmente fica linda. Os dias ficam mais longos com o sol se pondo depois das 21h. Flores decoram ruas. Festivais de música acontecendo semanalmente. Muitas atrações gratuitas. Muita gente ocupando parques e praias. Vancouver é uma cidade onde a diversidade é comum e todos podem se expressar da forma como quiserem, todo mundo é bem-vindo.

Vista do centro da cidade a partir do Waterfront Park em North Vancouver.

Vista do centro da cidade a partir do Waterfront Park em North Vancouver.

Mas o que mais me encantou até agora foi de fato a natureza. Muitos parques e trilhas são acessíveis de transporte público a partir do centro da cidade e muitos deles com entrada gratuita, o que torna os finais de semana ensolarados muito baratos pra se aproveitar.

Homem pescando em rio de água transparente no Capilano River State Park. Acessível de ônibus a partir do centro da cidade.

Homem pescando em rio de água transparente no Capilano River State Park. Acessível de ônibus a partir do centro da cidade.

Nas trilhas é comum ver famílias inteiras (inclusive com cachorros) caminhando ou acampando. E mesmo sem conhecer ninguém, os canadenses costumam cumprimentar qualquer um que encontra pela frente durante a trilha, portanto não se assuste ao ouvir um “Hello, how are you doing?” ou um simples “Hi!” acompanhado de um sorriso de um desconhecido. Esse é o jeito educado do canadense de ser e viver.

Upper Joffre Lake, o maior e mais bonito dos lagos em Joffre Lakes Provincial Park, um parque próximo de Pemberton, a pouco mais de 2 horas de carro de Vancouver.

Upper Joffre Lake, o maior e mais bonito dos lagos em Joffre Lakes Provincial Park, um parque próximo de Pemberton, a pouco mais de 2 horas de carro de Vancouver.

Passar horas caminhando numa trilha é muito mais que um simples passatempo pra mim, é sempre um novo desafio. É sobre testar os limites do próprio corpo e da mente. Do corpo, quando as pernas já não aguentam mais. Quando as bolhas no pé te imploram para parar. Quando a boca seca e a água da garrafa acaba. Da mente, para controlar todas as dificuldades enfrentadas e limitações físicas.

Depois de mais de uma hora subindo 1000 metros, a vista é recompensadora no Garibaldi Provincial Park.

Depois de mais de uma hora subindo 1000 metros, a vista é recompensadora no Garibaldi Provincial Park.

Diz a lenda que no fim do arco-íris há sempre um pote de ouro. Aqui em Vancouver no final de uma trilha há sempre um lindo lago com centenas de tons de verde e azul ou uma vista estonteante de um vale, de uma cidade, das montanhas. E no final, as dores são esquecidas e todo esforço é recompensado.

Garibaldi Lake e suas dezenas de tons de verde e azul.

Garibaldi Lake e suas dezenas de tons de verde e azul.

Por favor, votem em nós para a grande troca de blogs! 😀

REDES SOCIAIS

fb-icon twitter-icon instagram-icon pinterest-icon google-plus-icon